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Vale View Primary School

Vale ViewPrimary School

Term 4

Our topic this term is Whinless Wildlife.

Where in the world do animals live and why? How do animals come to live in zoos? Are zoos a good or bad thing? As growing Geographers we will develop the geographical skills to explore and confidently talk about how they can use a range of web-mapping and satellite programmes to locate where animals in captivity come from, we will then learn about these places and consider why this might be. In Science, we will extend our knowledge of ‘Amazing Animals’ from KS1 considering nutrition and what animals need to survive – asking the question is this the same for all animals? How many bones are in the human body? Do all skeletons look the same? What are the differences? As blossoming Biologists we will explore skeletons, muscles and their purpose.

For our Learning Lift off, we put together a model skeleton without any support, using what we know about human bodies. We examined x-rays of broken bones and diagnosed the issue. We also compared the skeletons of different animals, identifying the many similarities and the key differences.

"All the skeletons have spines and skulls." Phoebe-Jean

We have learned that skeletons provide us with support, protection and movement.

Our leg bones (fibula, tibia and femur) help us to stand, and out spine (made up of many vertebrae) help us remain upright. Our upper arm bone (humerus) and the collar bone (clavicle) help keep our bodies balanced and supported too.

We made models of our supporting bones. "I noticed that our upper arms and legs have one big bone but our lower arms and legs have two smaller bones." Jacob

We have learned that skeletons provide us with support, protection and movement.

Our leg bones (fibula, tibia and femur) help us to stand, and out spine (made up of many vertebrae) help us remain upright. Our upper arm bone (humerus) and the collar bone (clavicle) help keep our bodies balanced and supported too.

We made models of our supporting bones. "I noticed that our upper arms and legs have one big bone but our lower arms and legs have two smaller bones." Jacob

Skeletons Skeletons

Year 3 enjoyed a trip to Wildwood! We learned lots about skeletons – did you know that humans are born with 300 bones, but lots join together by the time we are adults to make a total of 206 bones?! Not all animals have skeletons on the inside (endoskeletons). Insects and spiders have exoskeletons: a hard shell on the outside of their bodies.

We saw lots of animals and compared their skeletons. Most animals have similar skeletons which are needed for support, protection and movement.

Woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip woodland trip

woodland trip

For out Learning Landing, Year 3 dissected chicken wings! We were able to see examples of ball and socket joints, hinge joints, different bones, and muscles working in pairs. It helped us understand about what's inside of us and how it all works!

​dissected chicken wings â€‹dissected chicken wings

dissected chicken wings! dissected chicken wings!

dissected chicken wings! dissected chicken wings!

dissected chicken wings!